Results tagged ‘ Records ’

The Filibuster

What’s the best way for me to indulge my twin passions of drinking and anything baseball related before the season starts?

Shaun
Chicago, IL
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Thank you for putting the ball on the tee, Shaun!

Indeed, drinking and baseball go together like politicians and gibberish, and we here at RSBS are no exception.  In fact, if it weren’t for this liberating combination of US American pastimes, there would be no Bleacher Bums, no Pirates fans (how could they survive?), no Miguel Cabrera.

So that is why we are proud to team up with Guinness, one of our favorite beers (Mr. Krause and I co-hosted a Guinness keg party in college, no joke) to set a record for the biggest St. Patrick’s Day party EVER!

The big day is getting closer and closer and we want YOU to be a part of it.  Unlike an evening with Mr. Krause, the process is simple and non-invasive.  All you have to do is follow THIS LINK, verify you’re 21 years of age or older, then click to “join the party”.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, in the “optional code” box, make sure to enter code “REDS“.  For each participant using that code, the good folks at Guinness are going to donate $1 to our charity of choice, the Baseball Tomorrow Fund and its Chicago chapter.  That’s right.  Your commitment to having a good (and responsible) time translates to more balls, bats, gloves and other baseball equipment for Chicago’s youth.

Now ain’t that a good thang!?!?

Join Guinness Brewmaster, Fergal Murray, this St. Patrick's Day while helping Chicago's youth reach their dreams on the diamond.

So if you haven’t done it yet, go do it!  Then sit back, crack open a tall can of Guinness and smile knowing you did something good.

THANK YOU!!!

Jeff

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Have a topic you want to see us Filibuster? Send us your Filibuster questions by emailing RSBSblog@gmail.com or by commenting below.

Guinness, RSBS and the Largest St. Patrick’s Day Party Ever

If you’re wondering who has the world record for fitting the most hard-boiled eggs in their mouth at one time, there’s only one resource: The Guinness Book of World Records.  Same thing if you want to know when and where the world’s largest omelette was cooked.  But the thing about these records is that when you look them up, you probably won’t find your name listed.  At least  until now.

This year, RSBS is partnering with Guinness and a bunch of other blogs to break the record for the biggest St. Patrick’s Day party….ever.  And we want you to be part of it.

The principle is easy.  If you’re 21 or older, just follow THIS LINK to the Guinness website, and once you’re in, click where it says “Join The Party.”  You’ll have to enter your first name, country and zip code in order to pledge to join the party and be part of the record.

But, much more importantly, in the “optional code” box, enter the code “REDS” and Guinness will send $1 to RSBS, a dollar which we’ll be donating to Baseball Tomorrow Fund participant, Noble Network Charter Schools.  That’s right, for each pledge that goes in under the RSBS name, you’ll be helping us provide baseball equipment to a bunch of kids in Chicago.

The interns search for the downside. Maybe it's at the bottom of that pint glass?

Trust me, we’ve tried to find the catch to this.  We even put the interns on the case but all to no avail.  Your pledge to join the largest St. Patrick’s Day party ever not only gets you in the book, it also helps bring baseball to kids who might not get to play otherwise.

Maybe you’ll never make it into the book as the world record holder for most cockroaches eaten in one hour but anytime someone brings it up, you’ll be able to say that you were part of world’s largest St. Patrick’s Day party.  Add in the fact that you’re helping RSBS bring baseball joy to some kids in Chicago and it’s an even more meaningful record.

-A

P.S. Guinness and RSBS remind you drink (and break world records) responsibly.

Record Breaking Singularity

Over the weekend, my brother-in-law and I had a deep discussion regarding what Major League records, streaks and milestones would never again be reached.  We volleyed, dipped and parried, throwing out memorized stats and tangible history: Joe Dimaggio’s 56 game hit streak.  The 300 win plateu.  5000 career strikeouts.  Pete Rose’s 4,256 hits.

On the surface, all of them seem insurmountable considering the modern game’s allegiance to softness, a result of the millions and millions and millions of dollars involved.  We concluded that the game was going to evolve into something else, perhaps a realm where the magical achievements of the 20th century would never again be rivaled — that they simply couldn’t be, because the people and the philosophies and the technologies of the game had changed.

Considering what we know now about how the human body works, why would a team subject its star athlete to a 162 game season, every year, with no breaks and no rest periods at all?  It just doesn’t make sense.

Which makes Cal Ripken’s 2,632 consecutive games played streak the holy grail of Major League records.

Unless…

We consider the very real (and imminent) arrival of the Singularity era.

That’s right.  For those of you unfamiliar with the concept, consider Moore’s Law, which applies the exponential growth theory to the amount of transistors that can be aptly placed within an integrated circuit.  The number doubles rather quickly (every two years or so), which is why 50 years ago the most basic of computers took up an entire wing of a building to do simple calculations and the iPhone or Droid you have in your pocket is able to take dictation, guide you from your home to the ballpark via GPS and give you the answers to any question at any time at speeds you never even dreamed possible (cue the Google Oracle music).

According to leading scientists, engineers and futurists, we are soon going to reach a point (within the next 30 – 50 years) where nanotechnology will be as common as laptops are today — that tiny yet powerful computers the size of blood cells will be programmed to reverse engineer the effects of aging, to fight off disease, to, in effect, provide superhuman powers.

Imagine having Albert Pujols, in the prime of his career, forever… or, at least for 40-50 solid years.  Imagine Justin Verlander striking out 500 hitters each season with his 145 mph fastball.  Imagine Carlos Zambrano murdering his entire –

Whoops.

Okay, so the Singularity era will also present some pretty controversial issues, like creating artificial intelligence that is able to out think us, which will blend the lines between what is real and what is not to the point where we could be opened up to an entirely new dimension, an entirely new worldview and/or perspective (like an ant suddenly realizing and being able to understand that there’s an entire world that exists above him).

But if we could see Albert in a Cardinals uni forever, tallying up as many career homeruns as there are trips around the sun and never getting hurt, I think all that sci-fi apocalypse shizz will be worth it.

So I retract my idea that some records will never be broken and confess: THEY ARE ALL GOING TO BE BROKEN.  Believe it.

And don’t hate me ‘cuz I’m right.

Peace,

Jeff

Makers and Breakers

Records are a huge part of baseball.  When a player comes along and makes an all out assault on a record previously though impregnable, we all take notice.  Did anyone 20 years ago think that Gehrig’s consecutive game streak would ever be broken?  But then along comes Ripken.  Same thing the summer of ’98 when Sosa and McGwire went back and forth on their way to shattering Maris’ record.

Sometimes, though, I prefer just focusing on the record makers instead of the record breakers.  Take a look and I think you’ll agree.

Happy Saturday!

-A

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